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ZWINGLIANISM AND LUTHERANISM IN BERN

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Part of the Studies in Early Modern Religious Reforms book series (SERR, volume 4)

Abstract

Bern is the most significant forgotten city of the Reformation. Its relative obscurity is seemingly due to the fact that it did not produce a single reformer of the first rank. The major Protestant reformers are inextricably linked to their urban environments: Luther and Wittenberg, Calvin and Geneva, Zwingli and Zurich, Bucer and Strasbourg, and perhaps even Oecolampadius and Basel. But of whom does one think when one thinks of Bern? Nevertheless, Bern was one of the most important Protestant powers of central Europe during the Reformation. At the same time, the lack of a “great man” is indicative of one of the city’s most significant problems at the time, namely the lack of theological unity. Just as no one theologian dominated the Bernese church, so also no single theology could be agreed upon, even by the ministers within the city itself, much less throughout Bern’s vast territories, especially after the conquest of Vaud.

Keywords

City Council Swiss Canton Protestant Politics Real Presence Military Alliance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Concordia UniversityIrvineU.S.A.

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