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Analyzing Teacher Knowledge in its Interactional Positioning

  • Jukka Husu

Keywords

Professional Learning Knowledge Construction Teacher Knowledge Pedagogical Knowledge Interactional Position 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jukka Husu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Applied Sciences of EducationUniversity of HelsinkiFinland

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