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Learning From ‘Interpreted’ Work Contexts

Planned educational change and teacher development
  • Vijaya Sherry Chand 
  • Geeta Amin-Choudhury 
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  • 1.3k Downloads

Keywords

Work Context Teacher Development Enrichment Strategy Listening Skill Pilot School 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vijaya Sherry Chand 
    • 1
  • Geeta Amin-Choudhury 
    • 2
  1. 1.Ravi J. Matthai Centre for Educational InnovationAhmedabadIndia
  2. 2.Indian Institute of ManagementAhmedabadIndia

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