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Comprehensive Development of Teachers Based on in-Depth Portraits of Teacher Growth

  • David R. Goodwin
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Keywords

Teacher Professional Development School Improvement Teacher Development Comprehensive Development Knowledge Landscape 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • David R. Goodwin
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Teacher Education at Southwest Missouri State UniversitySpringfieldUSA

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