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Developing Science Teachers’ Knowledge on Models and Modelling

  • Rosária Justi
  • Jan H. van Driel
Chapter

Keywords

Science Education Science Teacher Content Knowledge Pedagogical Content Knowledge Teacher Education Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rosária Justi
    • 1
  • Jan H. van Driel
    • 2
  1. 1.Chemical Education at the Federal University of Minas GeraisBrazil
  2. 2.ICLON Graduate School of EducationLeiden UniversityThe Netherlands

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