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The Causes and Consequences of Public College Tuition Inflation

  • Michael Mumper
  • Melissa L. Freeman
Chapter
Part of the Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research book series (HATR, volume 20)

Keywords

High Education Public College High Education Policy Income Quartile Public High Education 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Mumper
    • 1
  • Melissa L. Freeman
    • 1
  1. 1.Ohio University

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