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Professors as Knowledge Workers in the New, Global Economy

  • Jenny J. Lee
  • John Cheslock
  • Alma Maldonado-Maldonado
  • Gary Rhoades
Chapter
Part of the Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research book series (HATR, volume 20)

Keywords

High Education Labor Market Faculty Member High Education System Knowledge Worker 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jenny J. Lee
    • 1
  • John Cheslock
    • 1
  • Alma Maldonado-Maldonado
    • 1
  • Gary Rhoades
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for the Study of Higher EducationUniversity of Arizona

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