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College Environments and Climates: Assessments and Their Theoretical Assumptions

  • Leonard L. Baird
Chapter
Part of the Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research book series (HATR, volume 20)

Keywords

Cultural Capital Graduation Rate College Environment Information Distinguishing Campus Climate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leonard L. Baird
    • 1
  1. 1.The Ohio State University

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