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Bridging the Gap between Substance Use Prevention Theory and Practice

  • Brian R. Flay
  • John Petraitis
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Abstract

Reducing SU has been an elusive goal, and SU prevention programs for the past 30 years have had, at best, only modest success. Although programs have relied increasingly on theory and increasingly more comprehensive theory, they still have a long way to go to make full use of SU theories. Therefore, it is our belief that SU could be reduced further if program planners relied more on theory when designing their programs. A heavy reliance on theory could build programs upon a foundation of (1) less than obvious risk and protective factors, (2) multiple risk and protective factors that are modifiable within the context of the intervention, (3) careful consideration of how audience characteristics might moderate or interact with program effects, and (4) realistic considerations of the magnitude and immediacy of program effects. Without a heavy reliance on comprehensive theory, SU prevention might only continue its 30-year trend of modest success.

Keywords

Smokeless Tobacco Chronic Mental Illness Garland Publishing Fast Track Program Prevention Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brian R. Flay
    • 1
  • John Petraitis
    • 2
  1. 1.Preventive Research CenterUniversity of Illinois at ChicagoChicago
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Alaska, AnchorageAnchorage

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