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Risk and Protective Factors of Adolescent Drug Use: Implications for Prevention Programs

  • Judith S. Brook
  • David W. Brook
  • Linda Richter
  • Martin Whiteman
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Abstract

In conclusion, the current interest in the study of adolescent drug use is likely to broaden inquiry and yield a sounder base of evidence, both of which augur well for future investigations, for further comprehension of the etiology of drug use, and for prevention programs. Should the effect of prevention programs that address the childhood and adolescent risk factors identified in etiologic studies result in reduced drug use and abuse in future evaluations, empirical data will then be available that may yield further knowledge about the benefits of prevention programs.

Keywords

Prevention Program Protective Factor Adolescent Psychiatry Adolescent Substance Adolescent Drug 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Judith S. Brook
    • 1
  • David W. Brook
    • 1
  • Linda Richter
    • 2
  • Martin Whiteman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Community and Preventive MedicineMount Sinai School of MedicineNew York
  2. 2.The National Center on Addiction and Substance AbuseColumbia UniversityNew York

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