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Behavior of Pesticides in Water-Sediment Systems

  • Toshiyuki Katagi
Part of the Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology book series (RECT, volume 187)

Keywords

Overlie Water Plant Health Methyl Parathion Reductive Dechlorination Environ Toxicol 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toshiyuki Katagi
    • 1
  1. 1.Environmental Health Science LaboratorySumitomo Chemical Co., Ltd.Takarazuka, HyogoJapan

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