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Peripheral Chemoreceptor Activity on Exercise-Induced Hyperpnea in Human

  • SHINOBU OSANAI
  • TORU TAKAHASHI
  • SHOKO NAKAO
  • MASAAKI TAKAHASHI
  • HITOSHI NAKANO
  • KENJIRO KIKUCHI
Part of the ADVANCES IN EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY book series (AEMB, volume 580)

Abstract

It has been reported that hypoxic ventilatory response can be enhanced by an increase in work rate of exercise (Weil et al., 1972; Grover et al., 2002). However, it is still vague about how the muscular exercise produces the enhanced ventilatory responsiveness to hypoxia. Previous studies suggested that afferent nerve activity from carotid body was stimulated by some humoral factors related to muscular exercise, i.e. circulating catecholamine, lactate (Wasserman et al., 1986) and K+ (Band et al., 1985).

Keywords

Late Phase Carotid Body Afferent Nerve Activity American Physiological Society Muscular Exercise 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • SHINOBU OSANAI
    • 1
  • TORU TAKAHASHI
    • 1
  • SHOKO NAKAO
    • 1
  • MASAAKI TAKAHASHI
    • 1
  • HITOSHI NAKANO
    • 1
  • KENJIRO KIKUCHI
    • 1
  1. 1.First Department of MedicineAsahikawa Medical CollegeAsahikawaJapan

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