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Does AMP-activated Protein Kinase Couple Hypoxic Inhibition of Oxidative Phosphorylation to Carotid Body Excitation?

  • CN WYATT
  • P. KUMAR
  • P. ALEY
  • C. PEERS
  • DG HARDIE
  • AM EVANS
Conference paper
Part of the ADVANCES IN EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY book series (AEMB, volume 580)

Abstract

The carotid bodies are the primary peripheral chemoreceptors. They respond to a fall in blood pO2, a rise in blood pCO2 and consequent fall in pH by releasing neurotransmitters. These increase the firing frequency of the carotid sinus nerves which then correct the pattern of breathing via an action at the brainstem. It is now generally accepted that the type 1 or glomus cells are the chemosensory element within the carotid body. However, the precise mechanism by which a fall in pO2 excites the neurotransmitter rich type 1 cells has been the subject of hearty debate for decades now.

Keywords

Carotid Body Adenylate Kinase Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation Glomus Cell Carotid Sinus Nerve 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • CN WYATT
    • 1
  • P. KUMAR
    • 2
  • P. ALEY
    • 3
  • C. PEERS
    • 3
  • DG HARDIE
    • 4
  • AM EVANS
    • 1
  1. 1.School of BiologySt AndrewsScotland
  2. 2.Department of Physiology, The Medical SchoolUniversity of BirminghamUK.
  3. 3.Institute of Cardiovascular ResearchUniversity of LeedsUK.
  4. 4.Division of Molecular Physiology, School of Life SciencesUniversity of DundeeScotland

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