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In Search of the Acute Oxygen Sensor

Functional proteomics and acute regulation of large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels by hemeoxygenase-2
  • PAUL J. KEMP
  • CHRIS PEERS
  • DANIELA RICCARDI
  • DAVID E. ILES
  • HELEN S. MASON
  • PHILLIPPA WOOTTON
  • SANDILE E. WILLIAMS
Part of the ADVANCES IN EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY book series (AEMB, volume 580)

Abstract

Detecting and reacting to acute perturbation in the partial pressure of atmospheric oxygen (pO2), particularly hypoxia, is a fundamental adaptive mechanism which is conserved throughout the animal kingdom. In mammals, a number of cellular systems respond, often co-operatively as oxygen availability becomes compromised, with the express aim of maximising oxygen uptake by the lungs and of optimising its delivery to the metabolically most active tissues. Thus, during hypoxia, ventilation rate and depth are increased to maximize air flow across the gaseous exchange surface, local lung perfusion rates become rapidly matched to local alveolar ventilation and systemic arteriolar dilatation ensures that tissue and cerebral blood flow become swiftly optimized.

Keywords

Carotid Body Glomus Cell Hypoxic Ventilatory Response Peptide Mass Mapping Gaseous Exchange Surface 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • PAUL J. KEMP
    • 1
  • CHRIS PEERS
    • 2
  • DANIELA RICCARDI
    • 1
  • DAVID E. ILES
    • 3
  • HELEN S. MASON
    • 1
  • PHILLIPPA WOOTTON
    • 2
  • SANDILE E. WILLIAMS
    • 1
  1. 1.School of BiosciencesCardiff UniversityCardiffUK
  2. 2.Institute for Cardiovascular ResearchUniversity of LeedsLeedsUK
  3. 3.School of BiologyUniversity of LeedsLeedsUK.

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