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Genetic Regulation of Chemoreceptor Development in DBA/2J and A/J Strains of Mice

  • ALEXANDER BALBIR
  • MARIKO OKUMURA
  • BRIAN SCHOFIELD
  • JUDITH CORAM
  • CLARKE G. TANKERSLEY
  • ROBERT S. FITZGERALD
  • CRISTOPHER P. O’DONNELL
  • MACHIKO SHIRAHATA
Part of the ADVANCES IN EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY book series (AEMB, volume 580)

Abstract

The role of the carotid body (CB) in response to hypoxia is very well defined (Fitzgerald and Shirahata, 1997). The hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) is characterized by an increase in ventilation, but this response remains variable among individuals (Eisele et al., 1992; Vizek et al., 1987; Weil 1970). Genetics may play a critical role in explaining this variability. Indeed, longitudinal and twin studies do demonstrate the role of genetics in the HVR (Collins et al., 1978; Kawakami et al., 1982). Studies utilizing inbred strains of mice have also demonstrated the effect of genetics on the response to hypoxia (Tankersley et al., 1994 & 2000). Two strains of mice in these studies were identified as having extreme responses to hypoxia.

Keywords

Tyrosine Hydroxylase Inbred Strain Carotid Body Positive Ratio Glomus Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • ALEXANDER BALBIR
    • 1
  • MARIKO OKUMURA
    • 1
  • BRIAN SCHOFIELD
    • 1
  • JUDITH CORAM
    • 1
  • CLARKE G. TANKERSLEY
    • 1
  • ROBERT S. FITZGERALD
    • 1
  • CRISTOPHER P. O’DONNELL
    • 2
  • MACHIKO SHIRAHATA
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Division of Physiology, Bloomberg School of Public HealthJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Department of MedicineUniversity of Pittsburgh Medical CenterPittsburghUSA

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