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Can Cardiogenic Oscillations Provide an Estimate of Chest Wall Mechanics?

  • Eve Bijaoui
  • Daniel Anglade
  • Pascale Calabrese
  • André Eberhard
  • Pierre Baconnier
  • Gila Benchetrit
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 551)

Abstract

Every time the heart beats, it produces a mechanical deformation of the lungs causing small fluctuations of airway pressure and flow called cardiogenic oscillations (CO). CO have been observed on respiratory signals during pulmonary function tests, during relaxed expiration as well as during apnea, as a mean for differentiating central and obstructive apneas1. Finally, we have recently shown that the processing of CO in mouth pressure and airflow can be used as a non-invasive measurement of airway resistance2.

Keywords

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Chest Wall Heart Sound Peep Level Differential Pressure Transducer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eve Bijaoui
    • 1
  • Daniel Anglade
    • 1
  • Pascale Calabrese
    • 1
  • André Eberhard
    • 1
  • Pierre Baconnier
    • 1
  • Gila Benchetrit
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire PRETA-TIMCUniversité Joseph FourierLa TrancheFrance

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