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Transforming Local and Global Discourses

Reassessing the PTSD movement in Bosnia and Croatia
  • Paul Stubbs
Part of the International and Cultural Psychology Series book series (ICUP)

Keywords

Gender Perspective Displace Person Epistemic Community Global Discourse Peace Building 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Stubbs
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of EconomicsZagrebCroatia

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