Advertisement

Beyond The Personal Pain:

Integrating social and political concerns in therapy with refugees
  • Julia Bala
Part of the International and Cultural Psychology Series book series (ICUP)

Keywords

Family Therapy Asylum Seeker Mental Health Provider Meaningful Life Developmental Psychopathology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Ager, A. (2000) A constractivist framework for the analysis of children’s response to organized violence. In: L. Van Willigen (ed.), Heath Hazards of Organised Violence in Children II. Coping and Protective Factors, 21–29. Utrecht: Stichting Pharos.Google Scholar
  2. Agger I. & Jensen S.B. (1990) Testimony as Ritual and Evidence in Psychotherapy for Political Refugees. Journal of Traumatic Stress 3, 115–129.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Bala, J. (2001) Mother doesn’t laugh any more. Therapeutic interventions with traumatized refugee families. In M. Verwey (ed.), Trauma and Empowerment. Berlin: VWB-Verlag.Google Scholar
  4. Boscolo, L. & Bertrando, P. (1993) The Times of Time. A New Perspective in Systemic Therapy and Consultation. New York: W.W. Norton & Company.Google Scholar
  5. Boomstra, R. & Kramer, S.A. (1997) Cultuurverschillen in interacties tussen hulpverleners en vluchtelingen. Utrecht: ISOR.Google Scholar
  6. Carter, B. & McGoldrick M. (1989) The Changing Family Life Cycle. A Framework for Family Therapy. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.Google Scholar
  7. Cicchetti, D. & D.J. Cohen. (1995) Perspectives on Developmental Psychopathology. In: D. Cicchetti & D.J. Cohen (eds.), Developmental Psychopathology. Theory and Methods, 3–23. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  8. Cohler, B., Stott, F., & Musick, J. (1995) Adversity, vulnerability, and resilience: Cultural and developmental perspectives. In: D. Cicchetti & D.J. Cohen (eds.), Developmental psychopathology. Theory and Methods, 753–800. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  9. Dallos, R. (1997) Interacting Stories. Narratives, Family Beliefs and Therapy. London: Karnac BooksGoogle Scholar
  10. Drozdek, B. (1998) Getraumatiseerde asielzoekers en vluchtelingen. Maandblad Geestelijke Volksgezondheid 53, 490–501.Google Scholar
  11. Eastmond, M., Ralphsson, L. & Alinder, B. (1994) The Psychological Impact of Violence and War. Bosnian Refugee Families and Coping Strategies. Refugee Participation Network 16, 7–9.Google Scholar
  12. Figley, C. R. (1989) Helping Traumatized Families. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.Google Scholar
  13. Gore S. & Eckenrode, J. (1996) Context and process on risk and resilience. In: Haggerty, R.J., Sherrod, L.R., Garmezy, N., Rutter, M. (eds.), Stress, Risk and Resilience in Children and Adolescents, 19–64. Cambridge: Cambridge University PressGoogle Scholar
  14. Hanna, S.M. & Brown, J.H. (1995) The Practice of Family Therapy. Key Elements Across Models. Pacific Grove: Brooks/Cole Publishing Company.Google Scholar
  15. Haley, J. (1981) Reflections on Therapy. Washington: The Family Therapy Institute.Google Scholar
  16. Helmreich, W. B. (1992) Against All Odds: holocaust survivors and the successful lives they made in America. New Brunswick: Transaction Publishers.Google Scholar
  17. Kramer, S.A. (1999) Het psychologiseren van politieke ervaringen. Utrecht: ISOR.Google Scholar
  18. McCubbin, M.A. & McCubbin H.I. (1989) Theoretical orientations to family stress & coping. In: C.R. Figley (ed.), Treating stress in families, 3–45. New York: Brunner-Mazel.Google Scholar
  19. Pynoos, R.S., Steinberg R. & Wraight R. (1995) A developmental model of childhood traumatic stress. In: D. Cicchetti & D.J. Cohen (eds.), Developmental Psychopathology. Theory and Methods, 72–96. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  20. Richman, N. (1998) Looking before and after: refugees and asylum seekers in the west. In: Bracken, P.J. & Petty, C. (eds.), Rethinking the Trauma of War. New York: Free Association Books.Google Scholar
  21. Robinson. N.S & Garber, J. (1995) Social Support and Psychopathology Across the Life Span. Perspectives on Developmental Psychopathology. In: D. Cicchetti & D.J. Cohen (eds.), Developmental Psychopathology. Theory and Methods, 162–213. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  22. Rutter M. (1987) Psychological resilience and protective mechanisms. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry 45, 486–495.Google Scholar
  23. Rutter, M. (1996) Stress research: Accomplishments and tasks ahead. In: Haggerty, R.J., Sherrod, L.R., Garmezy, N., Rutter, M. (eds.), Stress, Risk and Resilience in Children and Adolescents, 354–387. Cambridge: University Press.Google Scholar
  24. Sveaass, N. & Reichelt, S. (2001) Refugee families in therapy: From referrals to therapeutic conversations. Journal of Family Therapy 25, 119–135.Google Scholar
  25. Silove, D. (2000) A conceptual framework for mass trauma: implications for adaptation, intervention and debriefing. In: Raphael, B. & Wilson, J. P. (eds.), Psychological Debriefing, Theory Practice and evidence. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 337–351.Google Scholar
  26. Stefanovski, G. (2004) A Tale from the Wild East. In: Snel G. (ed.), Alter Ego. Twenty Confronting Views on the European Experience. Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 21–27.Google Scholar
  27. Summerfield, D. (1997) South Africa: does a truth commission promote social reconciliation? British Medical Journal 315, 1393.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  28. Summerfield, D. (1999) A critique of seven assumptions behind psychological trauma programs in war-affected areas. Social Science & Medicine 48, 449–1462.Google Scholar
  29. De Swaan, A. (1982) De mens is de mens een zorg. Amsterdam: Meulenhoff.Google Scholar
  30. Van der Veer, G. (1992/1998) Counselling and Therapy with Refugees. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  31. Van der Veer, G. (1997) Gevluchte adolescenten. Ontwikkeling, begeleiding en hulpverlening. Utrecht: Stichting Pharos.Google Scholar
  32. Van der Veer, G. (1999) Psychotherapy with traumatized refugees and asylum seekers: working through traumatic experiences or helping to cope with loneliness. Torture 9, 49–53.Google Scholar
  33. Van Dijk, J. & Schreuder, B.J.N. (2001) De getuigenis als therapie. Beschrijving van een kortdurende therapeutische methode voor getraumatiseerde slachtoffers van politiek geweld. Tijdschrift voor Psychotherapie 27, 23–34.Google Scholar
  34. Van Essen, J., Somers, A.G. & Bala, J. (1995). Het weven van een tapijt. Vluchtelingenkinderen en-gezinnen tussen breuk en herstel. Oorlog tekent je leven. ICODO-lnfo 12, 84–97.Google Scholar
  35. Van Essen, J. (1999) Kinderen en gezinnen. In Rohlof, H., Groenenberg, M. & Bloem, C. (eds.), Vluchtelingen in de GGZ. Handboek voor hulpverlening. Utrecht: Stichting Pharos.Google Scholar
  36. Van Essen, J. (2000) personal communication.Google Scholar
  37. Walter, J. & Adam, H. (2000) Beyond victimology? Approaches and techniques for broadening up coping alternatives. In L. Van Willigen (ed.), Heath Hazards of Organised Violence in Children II. Coping and Protective Factors, 129–139. Utrecht: Stichting Pharos.Google Scholar
  38. Walsh F. (1998). Beliefs, spirituality and transcendence: Keys to Family Resilience. In McGoldric, M, (ed.), Re-visioning family therapy,. 465–484. New York: The Guilford PressGoogle Scholar
  39. Weine, S. M. (2001). Testimony with Bosnian Refugees of ethnic cleansing: Redefining merhamet after a historical nightmare. In D. Kideckel, & J. Halpern (Eds.). War in Former Yugoslavia: Culture and Conflict. University Park: Penn State Press.Google Scholar
  40. Weingarten, K. (1998) The small and the ordinary. The daily practices of postmodern narrative therapy. Family Process 37, 3–15.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julia Bala
    • 1
  1. 1.Centrum’ 45, De VonkAmsterdamThe Netherlands

Personalised recommendations