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Cell-Room Design

  • Thomas F. O’Brien
  • Tilak V. Bommaraju
  • Fumio Hine

Abstract

In their design and construction, electrochemical plants differ from ordinary chemical plants in several ways:
  1. 1

    by the major importance of electrical supply and its conversion to direct current;

     
  2. 2

    by the fact that the electrolyzers and the fluids they contain are parts of electrical circuits;

     
  3. 3

    by the unique considerations that apply to the electrolysis area.

     

Keywords

Power Factor Current Efficiency Alternate Current Personal Protective Equipment Fiber Reinforce Plastic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas F. O’Brien
    • 1
  • Tilak V. Bommaraju
    • 2
  • Fumio Hine
    • 3
  1. 1.Independent Consultant MediaUSA
  2. 2.Independent Consultant Grand IslandNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Nagoya Institute of TechnologyNagoyaJapan

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