Overview of the Chlor-Alkali Industry

  • Thomas F. O’Brien
  • Tilak V. Bommaraju
  • Fumio Hine

Abstract

The world production capacity of chlorine reached 53 million tons in 2002 from approximately 22 million tons in 1970 [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7] and is expected to increase to 65 million tons by the year 2015 [8]. In this chapter, the major manufacturing processes and the factors affecting the growth pattern of the chlor-alkali industry are presented.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas F. O’Brien
    • 1
  • Tilak V. Bommaraju
    • 2
  • Fumio Hine
    • 3
  1. 1.Independent Consultant MediaUSA
  2. 2.Independent Consultant Grand IslandNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Nagoya Institute of TechnologyNagoyaJapan

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