History of the Chlor-Alkali Industry

  • Thomas F. O’Brien
  • Tilak V. Bommaraju
  • Fumio Hine

Abstract

During the last half of the 19th century, chlorine, used almost exclusively in the textile and paper industry, was made [1] by reacting manganese dioxide with hydrochloric acid
$$MnO_2 + 4HCl\xrightarrow{{100 - 110^\circ C}}MnCl_2 + Cl_2 + 2H_2 O$$
(1)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas F. O’Brien
    • 1
  • Tilak V. Bommaraju
    • 2
  • Fumio Hine
    • 3
  1. 1.Independent Consultant MediaUSA
  2. 2.Independent Consultant Grand IslandNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Nagoya Institute of TechnologyNagoyaJapan

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