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Salicylanilides are Potent Inhibitors of Type III Secretion in Yersinia

  • Anna M. Kauppi
  • Roland Nordfelth
  • Ulrik Hägglund
  • Hans Wolf-Watz
  • Mikael Elofsson
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 529)

Conclusions

We have identified O-acyl salicylanilides as potent inhibitors of type III secretion in Y. pseudotuberculosis. These compounds can serve as a starting point for development of novel antibacterial agents that target virulence. Furthermore, compounds that affect bacterial virulence can be employed as chemical tools to study and further understand the processes involved in bacterial virulence. We now plan to use these derivatives in in vitro and in vivo experiments to study type III secretion in Yersinia and other Gramnegative bacteria. The Yersinia targets of these salicylanilides are unknown and our future work will also focus on target identification and optimisation of promising compounds with the goal to increase potency and selectivity.

Keywords

Potent Inhibitor Bacterial Virulence Target Virulence luxA Gene Secretion Machinery 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anna M. Kauppi
    • 1
  • Roland Nordfelth
    • 2
  • Ulrik Hägglund
    • 1
  • Hans Wolf-Watz
    • 2
  • Mikael Elofsson
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Organic Chemistry, Department of ChemistryUmeå UniversityUmeåSweden
  2. 2.Department of Molecular BiologyUmeå UniversityUmeåSweden

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