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Valuing Schools as Professional Communities: Assessing the Collaborative Prescription

  • Lawrence J. Leonard
  • Pauline E. Leonard
Part of the Studies in Educational Leadership book series (SIEL, volume 1)

Abstract

If the reforms currently transforming public education are to be sustained, it is commonly believed that they must be founded in new conceptions of schooling. Compelling among them is the recurrent edict that teachers and other educators must learn to work together in ways previously considered to be discretionary and, consequently, largely a matter of personal and professional preference. Not with standing its rising recognition as an essential ingredient of successful schools, collaborative practice remains an erratic and elusive enterprise that is fraught with uncertainty. The authors of this chapter use the literature and their own research experiences to explore how and why the wide scale establishment and nurturance of so-called professional learning communities may continue to evade realization. Despite habitual rhetoric to the contrary, a fundamental problem may be a lack of evidence that there is strong and manifested valuing of teacher collaborative practice as an integral component of schools as morally-bound communities.

Keywords

Transformational Leader Moral Dimension Professional Community School Culture Moral Community 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lawrence J. Leonard
  • Pauline E. Leonard

There are no affiliations available

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