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Deconstructing Communities: Educational Leaders and Their Ethical Decision-Making Processes

  • Jacqueline A. Stefkovich
  • Joan Poliner Shapiro
Part of the Studies in Educational Leadership book series (SIEL, volume 1)

Abstract

In our previous writings, we discussed the important part geography played in determining the decisions that our doctoral students in educational administration made when faced with ethical dilemmas. Those educational leaders working in urban areas tended to make very different decisions from those who worked in the suburbs based on how they thought the community would react to their choices. In this chapter, we build on our past research and begin to de-construct what community really means to educational leaders. With our current diverse doctoral cohort and with some of our former graduates, through the use of reflective essays, journal writings, and interviews, we address questions concerning their definitions of community and how their own community does or does not impact on their decision making processes. We believe this study will assist in discerning at a deeper level the multiple meanings of community and their effects on educational leaders in reaching ethical decisions.

Keywords

Ethical Decision Ethical Leadership Ethical Dilemma Professional Ethic Educational Leader 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jacqueline A. Stefkovich
  • Joan Poliner Shapiro

There are no affiliations available

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