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Photosynthesis pp 129-146 | Cite as

The Early Electron Acceptors of Photosynthetic Bacteria Bacteriochlorophyll and Bacteriopheophytin

Part of the Advances in Photosynthesis and Respiration book series (AIPH, volume 10)

Keywords

Photosynthetic Bacterium Primary Electron Donor Primary Charge Separation Bacterial Reaction Center Femtosecond Spectroscopy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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For further reading

  1. 1.
    WW Parson (1987) The bacterial reaction center. In: J Amesz, (ed) Photosynthesis, pp 43–62. ElsevierGoogle Scholar
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    C Kirmaier and D Holten (1989) Primary photochemistry of reaction centers from the photosynthetic purple bacteria. Photosynthesis Res 13: 225–260Google Scholar
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    B Ke and VA Shuvalov (1987) Picosecond spectroscopy in photosynthesis and primary electron transfer processes: In: J Barber (ed) Topics in Photosynthesis, Vol 8, pp 43–61. ElsevierGoogle Scholar
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    W Zinth and W Kaiser (1993) Time-resolved spectroscopy of the primary electron transfer in reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodopseudomonas viridis. In: J Morris and H Deisenhofer (eds) The Photosynthetic Reaction Center, vol II, pp. 71–88. Acad PressGoogle Scholar

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© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

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