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Structure, Dynamics, and Energy Conversion Efficiency in Photosystem II

  • Bruce A. Diner
  • Gerald T. Babcock
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Photosynthesis and Respiration book series (AIPH, volume 4)

Keywords

ENDOR Spectrum Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation Reaction Center Complex Primary Charge Separation Tyrosyl Radical 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruce A. Diner
    • 1
  • Gerald T. Babcock
    • 2
  1. 1.Central Research and Development Department, Experimental StationE. I. Du Pont de Nemours and CompanyWilmingtonUSA
  2. 2.Department of ChemistryMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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