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Where do New Ideas Come From? a Heuristics of Discovery in the Cognitive Sciences

  • Gerd Gigerenzer
Part of the Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science book series (BSPS, volume 237)

Keywords

Inferential Statistic Causal Attribution Logic Theorist Attribution Theory Conjunction Fallacy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerd Gigerenzer
    • 1
  1. 1.Max Planck Institute for Human DevelopmentCenter for Adaptive Behavior and CognitionBerlinGermany

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