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Strategic Career Development for People with Disabilities

  • David P. Moxley
  • John R. Finch
  • James Tripp
  • Stuart Forman
Chapter
  • 120 Downloads
Part of the Plenum Series in Rehablititation and Health book series (SSRH)

Keywords

Career Development Career Choice Work Role Career Counseling Vicarious Experience 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • David P. Moxley
    • 1
  • John R. Finch
    • 2
  • James Tripp
    • 3
  • Stuart Forman
    • 3
  1. 1.Wayne State University School of Social WorkDetroit
  2. 2.Rehabilitation ConsultantColumbus
  3. 3.Wayne State University School of Social WorrkDetroit

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