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Rehabilitation Services for Criminal Offenders

  • Nathniel J. Pallone
  • James J. Hennessy
Part of the Plenum Series in Rehablititation and Health book series (SSRH)

Keywords

Rehabilitation Service Juvenile Offender Young Offender Alcoholic Anonymous Boot Camp 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nathniel J. Pallone
    • 1
  • James J. Hennessy
    • 2
  1. 1.Rutgers, The State University of New JerseyNew Brunswick
  2. 2.Fordham University Graduate School of EducationNew York

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