Advertisement

Transitions between Home and School Mathematics: Rays of Hope Amidst the Passing Clouds

Chapter
Part of the Mathematics Education Library book series (MELI, volume 27)

Keywords

Mathematics Education Home Visit School Mathematic American Educational Research Association Bilingual Education 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Abreu, G. de (1995). Understanding how children experience the relationship between home and school mathematics. Mind, Culture, and Activity, 2, 119–142.Google Scholar
  2. Ayers, M., Civil, M., Fonseca, J.D., & Kahn, L.H. (1998). Connecting students’ everyday mathematics and school mathematics. In S. Berenson, K. Dawkins, M. Blanton, et al. (Eds.), Proceedings of the Twentieth Annual Conference of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (Vol 2, pp. 533–540). Columbus, OH: ERIC.Google Scholar
  3. Civil, M. (1993). Household visits and teachers’ study groups: Integrating mathematics to a sociocultural approach to instruction. In J.R. Becker & B.J. Pence (Eds.) Proceedings of the Fifteenth Annual Conference of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (Vol 2, pp. 49–55). Pacific Grove, CA: San Jose State University.Google Scholar
  4. Civil, M. (1995, April). Bringing the mathematics to the foreground. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Francisco, CA.Google Scholar
  5. Civil, M. (1998, April). Bridging in-school mathematics and out-of-school mathematics. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Diego, CA.Google Scholar
  6. Civil, M. & Kahn, L.H. (2001). Exploring big ideas in mathematics through a garden project. Teaching Children Mathematics, 7(7), 400–405.Google Scholar
  7. Civil, M. (in press). Everyday mathematics, ‘Mathematicians’ mathematics,’ and school mathematics: can we bring them together? In M. Brenner and J. Moschkovich (Eds.), Everyday and academic mathematics in the classroom. Journal of Research in Mathematics Education Monograph 11.Google Scholar
  8. Cole, M. (1998). Can cultural psychology help us think about diversity? Mind, Culture, and Activity, 5(4), 291–304.Google Scholar
  9. Forman, E.A., (1996). Learning mathematics as participation in classroom practice: Implications of sociocultural theory for educational reform. In L. Steffe and P. Nesher (Eds.), Theories of mathematical learning (pp. 115–130). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  10. Forman, E.A., & Carr, N. (1992, April). Using peer collaboration to foster scientific thinking: What determines’ success’?. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Francisco, CA.Google Scholar
  11. Frankenstein, M. & Powell, A. (1994). Toward liberatory mathematics: Paulo Freire’s epistemology and ethnomathematics. In P.L. McLaren & C. Lankshear (Eds.), Politics of liberation: Paths from Freire (pp. 74–99). New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  12. González, N., Civil, M., Andrade, R. & Fonseca, J.D. (1997, March). A bridge to the many faces of mathematics: Exploring the household mathematical experiences of bilingual students. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Chicago, IL.Google Scholar
  13. Harris, M. (1997). An example of traditional women’s work as a mathematics resource. In A.B. Powell & M. Frankenstein (Eds.), Ethnomathematics: Challenging eurocentrism in mathematics education (pp. 215–222). Albany, NY: SUNY.Google Scholar
  14. Kahn, L.H. & Civil, M. (2001). Unearthing the mathematics of a classroom garden. In E. Mclntyre, A. Rosebery, and N. Gonzalez (Eds.), Classroom diversity: Connecting curriculum to students’ lives (pp. 37–50). Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.Google Scholar
  15. Lave, J. (1988). Cognition in practice: Mind, mathematics, and culture in everyday life. New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Lave, J. (1996). Teaching, as learning, in practice. Mind, Culture, and Activity, 3, 149–164.Google Scholar
  17. Masingila, J. (1994). Mathematics practice in carpet laying. Anthropology & Education Quarterly, 25, 430–462.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Millroy, W. (1992). An ethnographic study of the mathematical ideas of a group of carpenters. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, Monograph number 5.Google Scholar
  19. Moll, L. (1992). Bilingual classroom studies and community analysis. Educational Researcher, 21(2), 20–24.Google Scholar
  20. Nieto, S. (1999). The light in their eyes: Creating multicultural learning communities. New York: Teachers College Press.Google Scholar
  21. Nunes, T. (1999). Mathematics learning as the socialization of the mind. Mind, Culture, and Activity, 6(1), 33–52.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Nunes, T., Schliemann, A., & Carraher, D. (1993). Street mathematics and school mathematics. New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  23. Presmeg, N.C. (1998). Ethnomathematics in teacher education. Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, 1(3), 317–339.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Rogoff, B. (1994). Developing understanding of the idea of communities of learners. Mind, Culture and Activity, 1, 209–229.Google Scholar
  25. Romo, H.D. (1999). Reaching out: Best practices for educating Mexican-origin children and youth. Charleston, WV: ERIC Clearinghouse on Rural Education and Small Schools.Google Scholar
  26. Secada, W. (1989). Agenda setting, enlightened self-interest, and equity in mathematics education. Peabody Journal of Education, 66, 22–56.Google Scholar
  27. Sheridan, T.E. (1986). Los Tucsonenses: The Mexican Community in Tucson, 1854–1941. Tucson, AZ: The University of Arizona Press.Google Scholar
  28. Skovmose, O. (1994). Towards a critical mathematics education. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 27, 35–57.Google Scholar
  29. van Oers, B. (1996). Learning mathematics as a meaningful activity. In L. Steffe and P. Nesher (Eds.), Theories of mathematical learning (pp. 91–113). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of ArizonaUSA

Personalised recommendations