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The Transition Experience of Immigrant Secondary School Students: Dilemmas and Decisions

Chapter
Part of the Mathematics Education Library book series (MELI, volume 27)

Keywords

Mathematics Education Mathematics Classroom Transition Experience Mathematical Practice Immigrant Student 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Monash UniversityMelbourneAustralia

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