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Opportunities for Child Health Professionals

Summary

Physicians, nurses, and other health care professionals can exert a powerful influence in support of gay and lesbian parents and their children, and of both gay and non-gay adolescents and parents of teenagers in their community. We can do this by avoiding and challenging assumptions of heterosexuality in the process of clinical care for children of all ages; by helping children and their families to understand the wide range of normal variation in sexual orientation; by helping schools and community organizations in their efforts to provide information and support to all children and families whatever their particular constellation. Within our own professional organizations we can work against homonegative attitudes that reinforce discrimination and the personal and professional limitations caused by stigma.

Keywords

Sexual Behavior Sexual Orientation Sexual Minority Academic Medicine Bisexual Woman 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

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