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Cryocoolers 11 pp 327-336 | Cite as

Investigation of a Single Stage Four-Valve Pulse Tube Refrigerator for High Cooling Power

  • T. Schmauder
  • A. Waldauf
  • M. Thürk
  • R. Wagner
  • P. Seidel
Chapter

Abstract

We discuss the optimization of a pulse tube refrigerator for high cooling power. Our approach is to increase the system efficiency by analyzing and reducing the various loss mechanisms. Because stationary losses (such as radiation and thermal conduction in the system) as well as design principles for the regenerator are well understood, our main effort is focused on controlling the flow behaviour of the working gas at the various tube connections between the components. For time resolved measurements of the gas velocity and gas temperature we use hot wire anemometry and thermocouples respectively. The results of this analysis are used to improve the design especially of the cold head heat exchanger and the hot end setup of the pulse tube. Despite the consequent separation of the in-and outlet gas at the hot end of the pulse tube we find a strong hot end loss caused even by very simple flow parallelizing devices at the hot end of the pulse.

A cooling power of 67 W at 70 K has been achieved. The aim of this project is a cooling power of 100 W at 80 K for thermal shielding for magnets and for cryopumps.

Keywords

Heat Exchanger Temperature Wave Pulse Tube Flow Straightener Cold Head 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Schmauder
    • 1
  • A. Waldauf
    • 1
  • M. Thürk
    • 1
  • R. Wagner
    • 1
  • P. Seidel
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für FestkörperphysikFriedrich-Schiller-Universität JenaJenaGermany

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