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Cryocoolers 11 pp 155-162 | Cite as

Gamma-Ray Pulse Tube Cooler Development and Testing

  • R. G. RossJr.
  • D. L. Johnson
  • A. Metzger
  • V. Kotsubo
  • B. Evtimov
  • J. Olson
  • T. Nast
  • R. M. Rawlings
Chapter
  • 1.2k Downloads

Abstract

For a variety of space-science applications, such as gamma-ray spectroscopy, the introduction of cryogenic cooling via a cryocooler can greatly increase the potential science return by allowing the use of more sensitive and lower noise detectors. At the same tune, the performance benefits must be carefully weighed against the implementation cost, any possibility of degraded detector performance associated with the operation of the cryocooler, and the requirement to achieve long life. This paper describes the development, test, and performance of a novel new low-cost, low-noise, high-reliability pulse tube cooler, designed specifically for highly cost-constrained, long-life space missions.

The developed cooler marries two technologies: a low-cost high-reliability linear compressor and drive electronics from the 1.75 W tactical Stirling cryocooler of DRS Infrared Technologies (formerly Texas Instruments), and an 80 K pulse tube developed specifically for the compressor by Lockheed Martin ATC. The successful new cooler achieves over 1.6 watts of cooling at 80 K at 23 W/W, and has the advantages of greatly reduced vibration at the coldtip and no life-limiting moving cold elements.

To achieve maximum life and low vibration, the compressor incorporates flat flexure springs for piston support and uses two opposing pistons in a head-to-head configuration with linear drive motors. The pulse tube is a compact U-tube configuration for unproved integration and is mounted to the compressor in a split configuration with a transfer line.

Keywords

Pulse Tube Charge Pressure Planetary Mission Drive Electronic Pulse Tube Cooler 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    Rawlings, R.M. and Miskimins, S.M., “Flexure Springs Applied to Low Cost Linear Drive Cryocoolers,” Cryocoolers 11, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, NY, 2001.Google Scholar
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    Ross, R.G., Jr., “JPL Cryocooler Development and Test Program: A 10-year Overview,” Proceedings of the 1999 IEEE Aerospace Conference, Snowmass, Colorado, Cat. No. 99TH8403C, ISBN 0-7803-5427-3, 1999, p. 5.Google Scholar
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    Kotsubo, V., Olson, J.R., Champagne, P., Williams, B., Clappier, B. and Nast, T.C., “Development of Pulse Tube Cryocoolers for HTS Satellite Communications,” Cryocoolers 10, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishing Corp., NY, 1999, pp. 171–179.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. G. RossJr.
    • 1
  • D. L. Johnson
    • 1
  • A. Metzger
    • 1
  • V. Kotsubo
    • 2
  • B. Evtimov
    • 2
  • J. Olson
    • 2
  • T. Nast
    • 2
  • R. M. Rawlings
    • 3
  1. 1.Jet Propulsion LaboratoryCalifornia Institute of TechnologyPasadena
  2. 2.Lockheed Martin ATCPalo Alto
  3. 3.DRS Infrared TechnologiesDallas

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