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Cryocoolers 11 pp 145-154 | Cite as

Miniature Pulse Tube Cryocooler for Space Applications

  • T. C. Nast
  • P. J. Champagne
  • V. Kotsubo
  • J. Olson
  • A. Collaco
  • B. Evtimov
  • T. Renna
  • R. Clappier
Chapter
  • 1.2k Downloads

Abstract

Lockheed Martin’s Advanced Technology Center (LM ATC) has developed a miniature, lightweight pulse tube cryocooler system for space operation under funding from NASA/GSFC. The cold end is a U-tube configuration, and is driven by a dual opposed piston flexure bearing compressor. The compressor utilizes a moving magnet linear motor and incorporates a number of features that simplify assembly and enhance reliability. This cooler is designed for 0.3 W of cooling at 65 K with a 310 K rejection temperature, 15 W of compressor power, and a mass of less than 1.25 kg. Three engineering model cryocoolers are to be delivered to NASA/GSFC. Two have been completed and test data is presented here on the EM performance.

In a parallel effort, we have developed a lightweight, power efficient electronic controller funded by LM ATC cost sharing funds for a DARPA contract. The first Engineering Model of this controller has been completed and functional testing has verified successful operation. All of the design goals have been met or exceeded.

Keywords

Space Application Control Board Pulse Tube Electronic Controller Static Load Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. C. Nast
    • 1
  • P. J. Champagne
    • 1
  • V. Kotsubo
    • 1
  • J. Olson
    • 1
  • A. Collaco
    • 1
  • B. Evtimov
    • 1
  • T. Renna
    • 2
  • R. Clappier
    • 3
  1. 1.Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology CenterPalo Alto
  2. 2.Lockheed Martin Communications and Power CenterNewton
  3. 3.Clappier ConsultingDiscovery Bay

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