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Cryocoolers 11 pp 125-129 | Cite as

Development of a 5W at 65 K Air-Cooled Pulse Tube Cryocooler

  • S -Y Kim
  • J -J Park
  • S -T Kim
  • W -S Chung
  • H -K Lee
Chapter
  • 1.2k Downloads

Abstract

LG Electronics (LGE) has developed an air-cooled Pulse Tube Cryocooler (PTC) for HTS applications. The air-cooled PTC provides 5.5 W of cooling at 65 K and 25°C ambient with 280 W of input power with a single-acting linear compressor. Its performance is greater than that of an LGE water-cooled PTC of last year, 4.9 W at 65 K and 20°C, with 270 W of input power. The air-cooled PTC, compared to the water-cooled one, has a lower-efficiency linear motor, a 3% decrease due to cutting down the cost of the linear motor, and a higher temperature at the surface of the aftercooler, 30°C higher than the water-cooled one. Thus, the performance has improved significantly.

We have optimized the geometry of the regenerator, the pulse tube, and the inertance tube using both simulation and test; a significant increase of the performance is noted. Also, to maintain the low cost target, we have decreased the cost of the linear motor and used a common heat exchanger for air-cooling.

Keywords

Linear Motor Pulse Tube Pulse Tube Refrigerator Vacuum Torr Magnet Assembly 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • S -Y Kim
    • 1
  • J -J Park
    • 1
  • S -T Kim
    • 1
  • W -S Chung
    • 1
  • H -K Lee
    • 1
  1. 1.LG Electronics Inc. Digital Appliance Lab. COMP TeamSeoulKorea

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