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Cryocoolers 11 pp 119-124 | Cite as

Development of a Long-Life Stirling Pulse Tube Cryocooler for a Superconducting Filter Subsystem

  • Y. Hiratsuka
  • K. Murayama
  • Y. Maeda
  • F. Imai
  • K. Y. Kang
  • Y. Matsubara
Chapter

Abstract

We have developed pulse tube cryocoolers for high temperature superconducting (HTS) filter subsystems used in the base stations of mobile telecommunication systems. In July 1999, we reported on our development of a 5 W Stirling pulse tube cryocooler with a contact-type compressor,1 with a cooling capacity of 5.5 W at 80 K for 200 W of input power. However, demands for a smaller-sized cryocooler with higher efficiency and with 5-year reliability prompted us to develop such a cryocooler with a U-type expander and a flexure-bearing-supported linear compressor with opposed pistons.

We have developed an HTS filter and a long-life Stirling pulse tube cryocooler to cool the filter whose cooling capacity is around 1W at 80 K, as previously discussed in a progress report.2 For a compressor input power of 60 W at an operating frequency of 52 Hz and a pressure-volume (P-V) work of 26 W, and for a compressor efficiency of 45%, this cryocooler achieved a cooling capacity of 1.05 W at 80 K (0.63 W at 70 K), a specific power of 92 W/W, 5.5% Carnot (3.9% Carnot at 70 K), and a specific P-V work of 40 W/W, with a minimum temperature of 57 K in an ambient of 23°C.

The key devices of this filter subsystem are an HTS filter and a low noise amplifier (LNA). The HTS filter is made from a YBCO HTS thin film and has a fractional bandwidth below 1.2% at 2 GHz and has a minimum insertion loss at 0.3dB. The HTS filter and the LNA are operated at a constant temperature of 70 K and the cooling capacity needed by them is 0.6 W. We integrated them with the cryocooler into a subsystem, and the external dimensions of this system are 194 mm high, 180 mm wide, 250 mm deep, with a total volume of 8.7 L.

Keywords

High Temperature Superconducting Cooling Capacity Pulse Tube Laser Vibrometer Fractional Bandwidth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    Y. Hiratsuka et al., “Development of a 1 to 5 W at 80 K Stirling Pulse Tube Cryocooler,” Cryocoolers 10, Plenum Press, New York (1999), pp. 149–155.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Y. Hiratsuka et al., “Development of a 5 W at 80 K Stirling Pulse Tube Cryocooler,” Advances in Cryogenic Engin., Plenum Press, New York (2000).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    E. Tward et al., “Miniature Pulse Tube Cooler,” 7th International Cryocooler Conference Proceedings, Air Force Phillips Laboratory Report PL-CP-93-1001, Kirtland Air Force Base, NM, April 1993, p. 113.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    J.L. Martin et al., “Design Consideration for Industrial Cryocoolers,” Cryocoolers 10, Plenum Press, New York (1999), pp. 181–189.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    S-Y Kim et al., “Development of Low-Cost Pulse Tube Cryocooler for HTS Applications,” Advances in Cryogenic Engin., Plenum Press, New York (2000).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Hiratsuka
    • 1
  • K. Murayama
    • 2
  • Y. Maeda
    • 2
  • F. Imai
    • 2
  • K. Y. Kang
    • 2
  • Y. Matsubara
    • 3
  1. 1.Semiconductor Equipment DepartmentDAIKIN Industries, Ltd.OsakaJapan
  2. 2.DAIKIN Environmental Laboratory, Ltd.Tsukuba, IbarakiJapan
  3. 3.Atomic Energy Research InstituteNinon UniversityFunabashi, ChibaJapan

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