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Tapa Beaters from 5000 to 4200 BP in Taiwan

  • Su-Chiu KuoEmail author
Chapter
Part of the The Archaeology of Asia-Pacific Navigation book series (AAPN, volume 1)

Abstract

Tapa beaters for making bark cloth first appeared in Neolithic Taiwan during the Tapenkeng Period, around 5000 to 4200 BP, and continued to be used by indigenous peoples throughout Taiwan’s later history. The Neolithic tapa beaters are made of stone and they fall into two categories: (1) Tapa beaters with handles. These developed during the early Tapenkeng Period, with a wide variety of shapes; and (2) Tapa beaters without handles (compound beaters). These developed in the later Tapenkeng Period and have only been found in small numbers. The compound tapa beater appears to have emerged as a later variation of the earlier type. Evidence suggests that tapa beaters and bark cloth culture developed locally in Taiwan. Tapa beaters are not present on the southeast coast of mainland China during the same time period or in earlier archaeological deposits from the mainland. Similar tapa beaters, with handles and without handles, are known from Southeast Asia but they are from a later date than those found in Taiwan.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of History and Philology, Academia SinicaTaipei CityTaiwan

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