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Child Deprivation

  • Aalok Ranjan ChaurasiaEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter analyses regional, residence and social class variation in child deprivation in India. The underlying premise of the chapter is that deprivation should be measured in terms of services and facilities that need to be provided to children to ensure their survival, growth, development and protection. Child deprivation in India remains highly pervasive. A substantial proportion of Indian children are devoid of even the basic services and facilities necessary for their survival, growth, development and protection. Improving the needs effectiveness and increasing the administrative capacity of child well-being efforts may contribute substantially towards addressing the deprivation faced by the children of the country.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.MLC Foundation and ‘Shyam’ InstituteBhopalIndia

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