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Research on Spatiotemporal Evolution Law of Black and Odorous Water Body in Guangzhou City

  • Qian Zhao
  • Liusheng HanEmail author
  • Yong Li
  • Ji Yang
  • Shuxiang Wang
  • Congjun Zhu
  • Yinguo Li
Conference paper
  • 43 Downloads
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 1228)

Abstract

The urban black and odorous water bodies affect the daily life of urban residents, destroy the aquatic ecosystem and damage the image of the city. This research used the evaluation method of black and odorous water body proposed by the Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development of the People’s Republic of China (MOHURD) to evaluate the water quality of 50 key creeks (53 sections) in Guangzhou in 2016 and 2017 and analyzed the spatial distribution of black and odorous water bodies and their changes over time. The results showed that the water quality of Conghua District, Panyu District, Nansha District, and Yuexiu District was relatively good, while the water quality of Baiyun District, Haizhu District, Huadu District, Huangpu District, Liwan District, Tianhe District, and Zengcheng District was relatively poor. Compared with 2016, the water quality of creeks in Huangpu District and Baiyun District deteriorated in 2017, while the water quality of creeks in Tianhe District, Liwan District, and Huadu District improved. The water quality of creeks in other districts did not change significantly. In 2017, ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N), total phosphorus (TP), and chemical oxygen demand (COD) content decreased, and dissolved oxygen (DO) content increased compared to 2016. In 2017, the number of black-odor water bodies was greatly reduced, and the water quality of creeks was generally improved. The results can provide a reference for the treatment of the black and odorous creeks in Guangzhou.

Keywords

Black and odorous water body Spatiotemporal evolution law Guangzhou City 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was jointly supported by China Southern Power Grid Guangzhou Power Supply Bureau Co., Ltd. Key Technology Project (0877002018030101SRJS00002); Guangdong Provincial Science and Technology Program (2017B010117008); Guangzhou Science and Technology Program (201806010106, 201902010033); the National Natural Science Foundation of China (41976189, 41976190); the Guangdong Innovative and Entrepreneurial Research Team Program (2016ZT06D336); the Southern Marine Science and Engineering Guangdong Laboratory (Guangzhou) (GML2019ZD0301); the GDAS’s Project of Science and Technology Development (2016GDASRC-0211, 2018GDASCX-0403, 2019GDASYL-0301001, 2017GDASCX-0101, 2018GDASCX-0101, 2019GDASYL-0103003).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Qian Zhao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Liusheng Han
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Yong Li
    • 2
  • Ji Yang
    • 2
  • Shuxiang Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Congjun Zhu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yinguo Li
    • 3
  1. 1.Shandong University of TechnologyZiboChina
  2. 2.Guangdong Key Laboratory of Geospatial Information Technology and ApplicationGuangzhou Institute of GeographyGuangzhouChina
  3. 3.State Grid Chongqing Yongchuan Power Supply CompanyYongchuanChina

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