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Confucianism and the Foundation of Human Rights

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Abstract

This chapter argues that Confucianism is compatible with the idea of human rights. In the first section, I survey the current debates on whether Confucianism is compatible with the idea of human rights. In the second section I discuss the virtue ethics reading and the role ethics reading of Confucian moral theory. In the third section I argue that regarding one possible foundation of human rights, human dignity, Confucian idea of human nature and virtues can provide a better foundation than the idea of autonomy. In the last section I address some of the objections to this argument.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of PhilosophyWuhan UniversityWuhanP. R. China

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