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Action Research and Indigenous Research Methodologies

  • Michelle JohnstonEmail author
  • Simon Forrest
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Abstract

This chapter introduces the philosophy and methodology of action research as well as introducing some other Indigenous research methodologies. Action research is a democratic and participatory way of working that is ideally suited to First Nations communities. The practical process of action research is described as a cycle of look, think and act and it is this process that provides a framework for the case studies in all the following chapters. Like action research, Indigenous research methodologies offer similar democratic and emancipatory ways of working. Like action research, they have an underlying philosophy that is respectful of Indigenous protocols, decolonises the research space and prioritises an Indigenous world view.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of HumanitiesCurtin UniversityBentleyAustralia
  2. 2.Curtin UniversityBentleyAustralia

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