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Major Nano-based Products: Nanomedicine, Nanosensors, and Nanodiagnostics

  • Firdos Alam KhanEmail author
Chapter
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Abstract

Nanomedicine is a very rapidly evolving field which has many biological, biomedical, and healthcare applications. Due to various beneficial properties of the nanomaterials, such as vast surface area, high biocompatibility, and biodistribution properties, these nanoparticles have been used to develop many useful products. Many of these nano-based products are under various developmental stages and many nanodrugs have been reported to have entered clinical phases of testing for various treatment conditions. In this chapter, we discuss some of the major nanoproducts which are developed for the treatment, diagnosis, and biosensing purposes.

Keywords

Nanoproducts Nanomedicine Nanodiagnostics Nanosensors FDA-approved products 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Stem Cell BiologyInstitute for Research and Medical Consultations, Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal UniversityDammamSaudi Arabia

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