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The Australian Landscape and the Making of Counter-Terrorism Laws

  • Sarah Moulds
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Abstract

Understanding the institutional context of Australia’s parliamentary committee system is critical when evaluating the impact of this system on the case study Acts and identifying options to improve its rights-enhancing capacity. This chapter introduces the Australian parliamentary committee system, with a focus on the four committees studied and how they fit within the broader parliamentary landscape.

This chapter also provides a broader overview of counter-terrorism law making in Australia since September 2011, sketching some of the domestic and international circumstances in which Australia’s modern counter-terrorism framework was developed and introduced. This chapter lays the foundation for a more detailed exploration of how parliamentary committees interact with the different law-making institutions at the federal level and the role they played in directly and indirectly identifying and addressing rights issues within the case study Acts.

References

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© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarah Moulds
    • 1
  1. 1.Justice and SocietyUniversity of South AustraliaAdelaideAustralia

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