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Flipping the English Language Arts and Literacy Classroom

  • Lisa A. FinneganEmail author
  • Katie M. Miller
Chapter
  • 15 Downloads
Part of the Springer Texts in Education book series (SPTE)

Abstract

English Language Arts and Literacy (ELA–L) encompasses reading of literature, informational texts, and developing foundational skills, as well as writing, speaking, and listening, and language. When considering flipping the ELA–L classroom, it is important to understand the complexity and scaffolded nature of the individual skills or components throughout K–12.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Florida Atlantic UniversityBoca RatonUSA

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