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Mental Frameworks: Psychological, Religious, Philosophical, and Political

  • Scott Hipsher
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Abstract

An examination of mental frameworks which are used to process information and mental obstacles preventing the more widespread adaptation of the Wealth Creation Approach to poverty reduction is presented. The chapter starts out examining mental models as well as biases and heuristics from a psychological or sociological standpoint. Next, the influences of religious, philosophical, and political values which shape the debates on poverty reduction and international trade are examined. The chapter rounds off with an examination of effects various cultural influences may have on our worldviews and values, often subconsciously, as related to approaches toward reducing poverty and creating wealth.

Keywords

Wealth Creation Approach Psychology Sociology Religion Philosophy Politics 

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Scott Hipsher
    • 1
  1. 1.BangkokThailand

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