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METAGOGY: Towards a Contemporary Adult Education Praxis

  • Gabriele StrohschenEmail author
  • Kenneth Elazier
Chapter
  • 11 Downloads

Abstract

Blended Shore Education (BSE), emerged from an international action research project (Strohschen, 2009). BSE originally provided principles for blending practices that interdependently guide teacher and student to implement contextually appropriate education programs within a ‘culturally reflexive consciousness’ (Gergen in Strohschen, 2009, p. x). This chapter presents the Metagogy Theorem in which the research that had resulted in the BSE concept was expanded with a further action research project. We suggest that the emerging Metagogy Theorem offers an essential framework for developing and implementing education programs across cultures, ideologies, nations, content and time.

Keywords

Blended shore education Metagogy Emancipatory education Adult education Education program design and development Critical reflection Phenomenology 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.DePaul UniversityChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Hampton UniversityHamptonUSA

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