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Design of an Airborne DIAL Measurement System for Measuring Concentrations of Atmospheric Pollutants

  • Yong Chen
  • Ding-fu Zhou
  • Ze-hou YangEmail author
  • Chun-li Chen
  • Yong-ke Zhang
  • Xiang-hua Niu
  • Jing Li
  • Xiao-feng Li
  • Guo-juan Zhang
  • Guo-hua Jin
Conference paper
  • 15 Downloads
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 657)

Abstract

This article presents the research aimed at developing a mobile, remote, fast and accurate measurement system for determining the concentrations of atmospheric pollutants in certain area. The proposed airborne different absorption lidar (DIAL) consists of three non-collocated components. The lidar source component consists of a transmitting antenna, receiving antenna, tunable CO2 laser emitter, information processor, viewing system turntable and other parts. This device can be installed either on a rotor helicopter or operated from unmanned and manned surface installations, such as vehicles, shipboard or floating surfaces. The lidar electronic cabin has the capacity to provide power to source components. In addition, the display control terminal provides man–machine interface, which enables the completion of functions of mode selection, data analysis, storage, playback, display, communication, among others. This system performs DIAL measurements, and the main technical parameters in the system are calculated. The simulation results obtained by using this system show promising performances with respect to the expected error budget in air pollution conditions. It is concluded that the development of this system can improve emergency management in case of disasters or other emergencies.

Keywords

Differential absorption Lidar Airborne Pollutant measurement 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yong Chen
    • 1
  • Ding-fu Zhou
    • 1
  • Ze-hou Yang
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Chun-li Chen
    • 1
  • Yong-ke Zhang
    • 1
  • Xiang-hua Niu
    • 3
  • Jing Li
    • 1
  • Xiao-feng Li
    • 1
  • Guo-juan Zhang
    • 1
  • Guo-hua Jin
    • 1
  1. 1.Southwest Institute of Technical PhysicsChengduChina
  2. 2.School of PhysicsBeijing Institute of TechnologyBeijingChina
  3. 3.State Key Laboratory of Geo-Information EngineeringXianChina

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