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Designing the Phenomenographic Study and Constituting the Outcome Spaces

  • Yuh Huann TanEmail author
  • Seng Chee Tan
Chapter
  • 29 Downloads

Abstract

In this chapter, we introduce phenomenography, which is the methodology adopted for the research work presented in this book. We first explain the choice of the phenomenography, the epistemology of phenomenography, and how the findings will be presented. Next, we explain how the phenomenographic study was designed, how the interview questions were developed, and how we identified the participants through purposive sampling strategies. This is followed by a description of the analysis procedures, which include concept mapping and development of themes from the data using online Lino canvas.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Yusof Ishak Secondary SchoolMinistry of EducationSingaporeSingapore
  2. 2.National Institute of EducationNanyang Technological UniversitySingaporeSingapore

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