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Interview with Karin Murris

  • Karin MurrisEmail author
  • Paulina Semenec
  • Claudia Diaz-Diaz
Chapter
Part of the Children: Global Posthumanist Perspectives and Materialist Theories book series (CGPPMT)

Abstract

Karin Murris’ interview elaborates on the “posthuman” child, as well as decolonizing teacher education. Inspired by the work of Karen Barad, Karin speaks profoundly about reading and writing diffractively. For Karin, diffraction in research means that instead of finding an “answer,” diffraction opens up different possibilities to think through and create new realities, which is often experiential and intuitive. She reminds us that the boundaries between culture and nature, the micro and macro, are also human-made (following Barad) which has important implications for research and how we understand the child. We found her discussion of “Laika” (introduced in her book The Posthuman Child) extremely moving in this interview, as it prompted discussions for us about child–animal relations, ethics, and difference. Her neologism “iii” instead of the human “I,” which she discusses in this interview, also challenged us to think about how the “I” is often so present in posthuman work. Karin’s “iii” forces us to read differently, something we often talk and write a lot about, but often struggle to put into practice.

Further Reading

  1. Murris, K. (2015). Posthumanism, philosophy with children and Anthony browne’s little beauty. Bookbird: A Journal of International Children’s Literature, 53(2), 59–65.Google Scholar
  2. Murris, K. (2016a). The posthuman child: Educational transformation through philosophy with picturebooks. London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Murris, K. (2017). Reconfiguring educational relationality in education: The educator as pregnant stingray. Journal of Education. 69, 117–138.Google Scholar

References

  1. Barad, K. (2007). Meeting the universe halfway: Quantum physics and the entanglement of matter and meaning. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Barad, K. (2014). Diffracting diffraction: Cutting together apart. Parallax, 20(3), 168–187.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Barad, K. (2017). Troubling time/s and ecologies of nothingness: Re-turning, re-membering, and facing the incalculable. New Formations, 92(92), 56–86.Google Scholar
  4. Braidotti, R. (2018). A theoretical framework for the critical humanities. Special Issue: Transversal Posthumanities. Theory, Culture & Society, 0(0), 1–31.Google Scholar
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  7. Murris, K. (2016b). The posthuman child: Educational transformation through philosophy with picturebooks. London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  10. Murris, K. (2019a). Children’s development, capability approaches and postdevelopmental child: The birth to four curriculum in South Africa. Global Studies of Childhood.Google Scholar
  11. Murris, K. (2019b). Choosing a picturebook as provocation in teacher education: The ‘posthuman family. In C. R. Kuby, K. Spector, & J. J. Thiel (Eds.), Posthumanism and literacy education: knowing/becoming/doing literacies (pp. 156–170). New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  12. Murris, K., & Haynes, J. (Eds.). (2018). Literacies, literature and learning: reading classrooms differently. London and New York: Routledge Research Monographs Series.Google Scholar
  13. Murris, K., & Bozalek, V. (2019). Diffracting diffractive readings of texts as methodology: some propositions. Educational Philosophy and Theory.Google Scholar
  14. Murris, K., Reynolds, R., & Peers, J. (2018). Reggio Emilia inspired philosophical teacher education in the Anthropocene: Posthuman child and the family (tree). Journal of Childhood Studies: Interdisciplinary Dialogues in Early Childhood Environmental Education Special Issue, 43(1), 15–29.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karin Murris
    • 1
    Email author
  • Paulina Semenec
    • 2
  • Claudia Diaz-Diaz
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Cape TownCape TownSouth Africa
  2. 2.University of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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